Osteoporosis

Our bones are living tissue that give our body structure, allow us to move and protect our organs. Osteoporosis is a condition where bones become thin and  lose their strength. This can lead to fractures, which cause pain and make everyday activities extremely difficult. After a hip fracture, about one-quarter of people die or never walk again. 

It’s estimated over 200 million women have osteoporosis. That’s more than the combined populations of the Germany, the United Kingdom and France.

Worldwide, one in three women and one in five men over the age of fifty will experience an osteoporotic fracture.

In fact, every three seconds a bone will break, somewhere in the world, because of this disease.

Many people won’t know they have osteoporosis until their first fracture, which is why it’s called the ‘silent disease’. Even after a break, it often goes untreated.

The good news is osteoporosis can be diagnosed and treated and fractures often prevented through healthy lifestyle choices and appropriate medication for those in need.
 

Our Bone Health Advocates

Baroness Julia Cumberlege, member House of Lords, former UK health minister, prominent osteoporosis advocate. Message on the occasion of the 2nd IOF Women Leaders Roundtable, 2006

It does seem incredible that a disease that can be diagnosed and can be successfully treated is not a major health issue. We must do all we can to prevent, treat and ultimately cure this painful and life restricting disease.

Su Majesad Reina Rania, discurso en la Primera Mesa redonda de Mujeres Líderes en Lisbo, Portugal - Mayo 2002.

Si bien existen tratamientos efectivos para la osteoporosis, cada año millones de abuelas se lastiman y sufren porque no tiene fácil ni suficiente acceso al diagnóstico y la medicación.

Mark Holden, songwriter and performer

Before I was diagnosed, I don’t think I’d ever heard of a man having osteoporosis. It came as a complete shock to me that men even have it. I come about it by being pro-active, by doing weight bearing exercises, by the supplements, by the actual drug that I particularly use, the kind of food that I eat, and I do try and booze a little less. Osteoporosis was just a word before I actually discovered that I actually had it.